How the University of Maryland faculty are fighting back against Donald Trump

University of Michigan professor Robert Kelly has written an op-ed arguing that the US President should not be allowed to visit the university.

The Washington Post reported that Kelly, who is also the US Department of Education’s special advisor for academic freedom, has urged the university’s trustees to refuse to allow Trump to visit until the president proves his loyalty to the university, as well as to reinstate the professor’s suspension from the faculty.

Trump has repeatedly threatened to cancel the universitys contract with the state of Maryland, which is responsible for running it.

Kelly has also called for a nationwide boycott of Trump, saying he is a threat to the institution’s ability to provide a “safe space” for students to discuss controversial issues.

“We need to take a stand against the hate and hate speech coming out of the Trump administration and stop supporting the administration,” Kelly said in the op-ad.

“It’s not about the political party, it’s about the president.

We have to stand up to him and we have to do it now.

I don’t think we can afford to let this administration get away with doing things.”

University of Maryland professor Robert Kelsey, left, with University of Florida professor Katherine Cross during the university commencement ceremony.

University of Michigan faculty member Katherine Cross speaks at a protest against the president’s policies, after an attack in Alexandria, Virginia, on August 4, 2020.

Kelly’s op-al says that Trump has “continuously demonstrated a clear disregard for the principles and integrity of the University’s mission, including its mission to promote a free, vibrant, and pluralistic society”.

“This includes the ability of the president to travel, attend public events, and make statements of his own without consequence,” he wrote.

“These actions, combined with the administration’s blatant disregard for due process, threaten the academic freedom of all faculty members.”

Trump has been a vocal critic of the university system, especially in the aftermath of the death of black professor Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Virginia.

He has also expressed a desire to abolish the US government and replace it with a “corrupt” “one-party dictatorship”.

In an interview with the Post in April, Kelly said he was “not a fan” of Trump’s policies.

“I think he has some of the most outrageous things I’ve seen,” he said.

“The idea that he is going to take the US out of a situation where he’s going to have to negotiate with somebody like Vladimir Putin is crazy.

I mean, this is a crazy country.

He’s going into Russia.”

But he said Trump had the support of his university’s president, the regents and trustees.

“It’s an institution that is very well positioned to say, ‘Well, we will not be intimidated by you or by this administration.

We will not allow it to undermine the core principles of the American university system,'” Kelly said.”

The president has a lot of support at the University, and I think that they will stand up for their president, and that’s really the key.”

You can’t be intimidated.

It’s an amazing institution.

“University spokesman Greg Gause said the university had already made clear that it was not going to tolerate a president who “tends to make inflammatory, hateful statements and who has engaged in divisive behavior”.”

The university has also defended its actions against Trump, including an effort to fire a professor who had said he would resign from the university after a video surfaced showing him saying he would “f—ing kill” his wife and child if they were not given a job.””

We will not stand for those values to be threatened.”

The university has also defended its actions against Trump, including an effort to fire a professor who had said he would resign from the university after a video surfaced showing him saying he would “f—ing kill” his wife and child if they were not given a job.

“Any time we are challenged to defend ourselves or our institutions, we take swift and decisive action,” university spokesperson David Stroud told the Post.

Related Post